Travel Trailer Vs. Motorhome

Our process for deciding on what to do after the motorhome was of course part emotional and part calculation.
On the emotional side we had to factor in leaving our home on wheels that we’ve enjoyed so much and have upgraded over the years against a major lifestyle change.
A major factor was also understanding what we would gain and what we would be giving up as part of a change from our DP.
To help us with this process, we came up with the following comparison table:
Description

Trailer

Motorhome

Kitchen access while underway.

X

Lavatory access while underway.

X

Set-up and beak-down time.
Maneuverability.
Storage.

X

Preventive Maintenance.

X

Complexity.

X

Fueling.

X

Heating/Hot Water

X

Repair costs.

X

RV Park/Resort access.

X

Miles per Gallon.

X

Some additional explanation is needed for this comparison:
We didn’t give an advantage to either for set-up and break-down time.  While you could argue that the DP was easier with regard to levelling versus backing up and levelling the trailer, in our case we normally stay at places that have concrete pads so that side-to-side levelling wasn’t a regular occurrence.  Factoring in the time it took to disconnect and park the tow car as well as set-up the long hose runs on the DP for power, water and sewer as well as window (windshield, front side) shades we can actually have the trailer set-up faster and easier.  If the pad/site is not very level then the trailer would take longer.  In our case we also assumed that there are two of us…a person by themselves would take a lot longer due to the need to get out of the truck several times during backing in and levelling.
Maneuverability we also ranked the same.  For us, the DP is definitely easier to get through intersections, RV parks, etc.  However, we can’t back it up (toad attached) and the ability to back up the trailer can be priceless.  This is especially true the few times a year I get us into a position where I would otherwise have to disconnect the toad.  Now you can make the argument that it is harder to backup the trailer, but that is mroe a function of practice and experience — as well as having a great spotter.
Some of the areas that we definitely miss from the DP include storage and the hydro-hot for hot water and heat.  There is just no comparison on these items.
We gave the Fueling nod to the trailer.  While in our case we still use diesel (our truck) we can access more stations and don’t have to go to truck stops.  While we have nothing against the truckstops, having to go inside to pay — and often prior to payment as well — was an inconvenience.
You might wonder why we listed repair costs and repairs as two seperate items.  Quite simply, we consider “repairs” to be the process that you have to go through in order to take care of a problem.  With a DP for major work you are generally at a truck repair center of some sort or a Coach-Care which is nearly the same.  For minor work you usually end up with an RV dealer or a mobile repair technician.  Either way you have systems that in our experience can not be fully addressed by either and so you not only end up having to use multiple repairers, but also have to be able to handle the potential conflicts and research into what may be the underlying problem.  If you don’t, you are likely to face larger repair bills due to the nature of each to throw parts at the problem if they don’t understand/have experience with your rig and how the system that has failed is installed.
On the other hand, with a trailer you generally can have most anything done in the fields or worst case by an RV dealer.  If there is a tow vehicle problem you can have it repaired at either the car/truck dealer or an independant shop.  To us this is a great advantage, not to mention that your home on wheels is still available to live in whiel they repair the tow vehicle.
I believe that all of the rest is self-explanatory.

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